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Honor Code

The Brookwood tradition of excellence requires an academic environment that rejects cheating or any other form of dishonesty. An essential part of education is developing a sense of honor, responsibility, and ethical principles that extend to all facets of life. Self-esteem and self-respect grow from meeting challenges with honesty and individual effort. Students earn respect for themselves and their academic work through academic integrity and ethical conduct. Recognition, understanding, and using academic integrity policies prepare students for college and life. It is an essential part of education and citizenship.

THE HONOR CODE OF BROOKWOOD HIGH SCHOOL

 

PHILOSOPHY

The Brookwood tradition of excellence requires an academic environment that rejects cheating or any other form of dishonesty. An essential part of education is developing a sense of honor, responsibility, and ethical principles that extend to all facets of life. Self-esteem and self-respect grow from meeting challenges with honesty and individual effort. Our students can earn respect for themselves and their academic work through academic integrity and ethical conduct.

As a student citizen of Brookwood High school:

  • I will not lie, cheat, or steal in my academic work.
  • I will oppose all forms of academic dishonesty, including plagiarism.
  • I will give prompt notification to a faculty member or principal when I observe academic dishonesty in any situation.
  • I will give careful attention to crediting sources from books, periodicals, or the Internet.
  • I will not use technology to represent work as my own when it is not.
  • I will not share information from a test, quiz, or essay with other students.
  • I will not allow other students to copy my work or tests. I will not share my homework or class work unless the teacher instructs the class to do so.
  • I will support honesty and responsibility as the foundations of the BHS tradition of excellence.

Brookwood High School aligns academic honesty policies with similar policies found at colleges and universities. Recognition, understanding, and using academic integrity policies prepare students for college and life. It is an essential part of education and citizenship.

 

DEFINITION OF CHEATING

Cheating includes any attempt to defraud, deceive, or mislead a teacher’s efforts to arrive at an accurate assessment of individual student achievement.

Cheating includes, but is not limited to, the following:

  1. Looking at any test, quiz, or exam of another student while taking an assessment.
  2. Attempting to communicate any kind of information in any way during an in-class assessment.
  3. Having cheat sheets or information written on the body or other personal objects.
  4. Using calculators or other electronic devices unless expressly permitted by the teacher.
  5. Looking at quizzes, tests, or exam materials prior to their administration.
  6. Failing to give credit to the ideas, words, or works of others.
  7. Giving information regarding an assessment to another student who is scheduled to take the same evaluation.
  8. Submitting work that is not created by the student through the use of technology, including but not limited to file sharing (submitting the same work with different header), copying files to and from disks and websites, or purchasing solutions or works from others.
  9. Using storage devices to capture test information without the permission of the teacher (i.e., camera phones, digital recorders, etc.).
  10. Having a cell phone or other device in plain sight can also result in a cheating consequence.

CATEGORY VIOLATIONS

Examples of cheating may include but are not limited to the following:

 
Homework

Homework is assigned as a means of reinforcing classroom instruction and is often used as an indicator of student comprehension or progress.

 

Honor Code Violations of Homework:

  1. copying or paraphrasing all or part of another’s homework
  2. allowing another to copy or paraphrase your work
  3. receiving help on assignments that have been identified by the teacher as work to be done solely by you
  4. using summaries such as Spark Notes or other paraphrases instead of doing assigned reading
Tests

Obtaining or giving test information prior to, during, or after a test or quiz is considered cheating.

     

Honor Code Violations of Tests:

  1. passing test questions or answers to students in your class or in another class or school
  2. receiving test questions or answers from students in your class or in the class period before yours or in another class or school
  3. copying someone else’s answers
  4. possessing or using “crib” or cheat sheets on the body or on personal objects
  5. obtaining a copy of the test or quiz before it is administered
  6. attempting to gain an unfair advantage before or during a test, such as looking at another student’s work, turning around, leaving books or notes open; signaling; deliberately and repeatedly choosing to miss classes through unexcused absences, lateness to school, or early dismissal to avoid taking a test or handing in an assignment
  7. modifying electronic test materials so they will not score properly
Research Papers and Essays

Plagiarism is the act of stealing, using, and representing another person’s ideas or words as your own writing or ideas. Properly document the sources of information used for your research paper and essays so that you will not be guilty of plagiarism.

     

Honor Code Violations of Research Papers and Essays:

  1. copying phrases, sentences, or paragraphs without using quotation marks and giving proper documentation of the source
  2. paraphrasing or summarizing ideas without giving proper documentation of the source
  3. asking someone or paying someone to write a research paper
  4. selling or giving an assignment or essay to students who submit it as their own work
  5. downloading from the Internet a research paper or article in its entirety or in part to submit as your own
  6. submitting another student’s research paper as your own work
Lab Reports

While you may work in the lab with a partner and each of you will have the same data, the remaining sections of the lab report should be your own work. This includes any computations, graphs, diagrams, and conclusion questions.

 

Honor Code Violations of Lab Reports:

  1. attempting to corrupt another student’s data
  2. presenting another student’s work (computations, graphs, diagrams, answers to conclusion questions) as your own
  3. misrepresenting or falsifying laboratory data
Use of Calculators

Calculators may be used in class only with the permission of the instructor.

     

Honor Code Violations of Calculator Use:

  1. sharing a calculator during a test or quiz
  2. using any calculator in class not approved by the teacher
  3. storing test information in calculators
  4. using test information that has been stored in a calculator
Technology Use

At Brookwood High School, technology is an important instructional resource. The use of computers is a privilege, not a right. Failure to follow the guidelines established in school policy and the Gwinnett County Public Schools Student Conduct Behavior Code will result in disciplinary action that may include restricted or denied access to school computers and other instructional technology tools.

  1. Students will use technology for educational purposes only.
  2. Any student who intentionally damages and/or vandalizes any hardware or software will receive an administrative referral to be disciplined for school property abuse.
  3. Students will observe software copyright laws and fair use guidelines. They will not be permitted to copy school software or bring software from home to install on the school machines.
  4. Students will be held responsible for information viewed, received, and sent when using the Internet.
  5. The use of online services will be restricted to school-related projects. Information and graphics downloaded from the Internet must be directly related to assigned class activities. Downloading of games and other program files with extensions such as .bat, .exe, .zip, and MP3 is strictly prohibited.
  6. Students will not attempt to access personal data or e-mail of others, including peers, teachers and administrators.
  7. Students will not share passwords to their files or try to break desktop or network security on any machine in the school.

Students should be aware that conduct violations related to technology use might also constitute criminal offenses punishable by law.

 

Student Responsibilities to Avoid Cheating

  1. Ask permission to use a cover sheet during quizzes and tests.
  2. Ask teachers to specify if students work is to be done cooperatively or individually if there is any doubt.
  3. Remove all materials from your desk top except for test materials.
  4. Zip book bags closed. Make sure all books are closed. Put away any loose papers.
  5. Take careful notes when doing research in order to avoid plagiarism. Don’t forget that any idea not your own must be properly documented, even if a paraphrase rather than direct quotes are used.
  6. Respect yourself. Take pride in your work and your work ethic.

ADMINISTRATIVE CONSEQUENCES FOR HONOR CODE VIOLATIONS

If a student violates the Honor Code, the teacher will give a zero for the assignment, contact the parents, and make an administrative referral. The disciplinary action will begin on Step 3 of the Disciplinary Scale. The consequences will advance one step on the Disciplinary Scale for each repeated offense.

Additional penalties may include but are not limited to the following:

  • Loss of National Honor Society or other honor society membership
  • Loss of eligibility for admission into National Honor Society or other honor society
  • Loss of Beta Club membership
  • Loss of Student Government or other student leadership group position(s) and/or memberships
  • Loss of eligibility for Student Council officer positions and/or membership
  • Loss of Honor Graduate status
  • Loss of Honor Graduate stole
  • Loss of Valedictorian status and medal
  • Loss of Salutatorian status and medal
  • Loss of other privileges, positions, or opportunities requiring trustworthiness and responsibility